Sukanto Tanoto, the Robin Wood

Sukanto tanoto, mostly known to environmentalists as Robbin’ Wood, and he acts as a philantropist to the top universities
Here’s some of the lists

  • Sukanto Tanoto and his wife Tina is listed as The Highlands Circle at Carnegie Mellon. This recognition society is for donors who contribute $1 million or more to the university over the course of their lifetimes or through their estates.  Membership in this most prestigious society includes more than 200 individuals, families, corporations and foundations.  http://www.carnegiemellontoday.com/article.asp?aid=277

  • Sukanto Tanoto is in the member of the Board of Overseers at Wharton, Upenn

Serving as a bridge between the School and the broader Wharton and business community, the Board of Overseers helps to inform the ongoing priorities and future direction of the Wharton School overall. The Board is an important component of Wharton’s volunteer leadership structure, and provides alumni leaders and friends with the opportunity to share their expertise with the School.

He’s listed also as The Executive’s Circle at Wharton (Gifts of $100,000 to $499,999)
  •  MIT Sloan School of Management
Sukanto Tanoto donated $1,000,000 http://web.mit.edu/annualreports/pres00/13.00.html
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Tanoto Center for Asian Family Business and Entrepreneurship Studies

While Sukanto Tanoto is known for tax fraud, creating environmental disasters and destroying rainforests in Indonesia, he acts like a good samaritan giving millions of dollars as donations to the Universities.

The latest is a donation to HKUST in Hong Kong with donations from Tanoto Foundation and Mr James E Thompson To Boost Study on Asian Family Business and International Business Related Cases.
They named the center after him
The Tanoto Center for Asian Family Business and Entrepreneurship Studies

The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) received donations from Mr Sukanto Tanoto, Chairman of RGE Group and the Founder of Tanoto Foundation and Mr James E Thompson, Founder and Chairman of Crown Worldwide Group, to boost the study on Asian family business, entrepreneurship and business cases. In appreciation of this act of generosity and support, the University named the Tanoto Center for Asian Family Business & Entrepreneurship Studies and the Thompson Center for Business Case Studies in their honor respectively today.

See the news here

http://www.bm.ust.hk/bm/Web/PressReleasePage.aspx?PressReleaseId=203&Version=English

You can write an email to the provost and directors

afbs@ust.hk, ophkust@ust.hk, rking@ust.hk, pengq@ust.hk, info@coolearth.org, ernestchan@ust.hk, ni@ust.hk, wmcheung@ust.hk, glorialeung@ust.hk, preschan@ust.hk, presada@ust.hk, preschoy@ust.hk, provost@ust.hk, leonard@ust.hk

Dear Madam & Sir
I have noted with concern that you are accepting donation from Sukanto Tanoto and established theTanoto Center for Asian Family Business and Entrepreneurship Studies at HKUST.
Sukanto Tanoto is the CEO of APRIL (Asia Pacific Resources International Limited). APRIL is a company which is known to be responsible for clearing massive areas of rainforest in the Indonesian province of Riau to create acacia plantations.APRIL is also draining large areas of peat bog. APRIL’s production methods are an ecological, social, and climatic catastrophe.
Are you comfortable having a centre named after a man who is famosu for tax fraud and destroying rainforests in Indonesia.
The rainforest on Sumatra is a highly diverse ecosystem – if the forest dies, the native animals and plants will have no chance to survive. This development especially threatens the critically endangered Sumatran Tiger – the greatest threat to this animal is listed as “the loss of habitat through palm oil and acacia plantations.” In 2010, APRIL was banned from the FSC certification system as a consequence of its production methods.
Furthermore, the rainforest is home to agricultural communities that process products traditionally and sustainably. The plantations are threatening to drive these farmers from their land and destroy their livelihoods.
The peat bogs in particular are important natural carbon sinks. In destroying the bogs, massive quantities of stored greenhouse gases are released into the atmosphere. Due to the destruction of its rainforests, Indonesia is the third-largest CO2 emitter in the world. The acacia plantations created to manufacture PaperOne paper exacerbate the negative impact on our climate.
As a respected university, you should share responsibility for ensuring that the donation you accept does not come from operation that destroy the environment, causing global warming, and destruct the habitat of human and animals.
I emphatically request that you consider the donation, consequently setting a positive example of how universities can embody corporate responsibility, respect for human rights, and environmental protection.
Respectfully,

Sukanto Tanoto and Deutsche Bank

A New Chapter
Suzanne Nam 12.24.07
http://www.forbes.com/global/2007/1224/044.html

For five years Edwin Soeryadjaya battled Indonesian billionaire Sukanto Tanoto for control of coal producer Adaro. His recent legal victory helped him hold on to his spot among Indonesia’s 40 Richest and restore his family’s reputation.

On Sept. 21 Singapore’s high court ruled that Edwin Soeryadjaya’s holding company had fairly acquired shares in Indonesia’s second-biggest coal producer, Adaro Indonesia. “My first thought was, ‘Hallelujah,'” says Soeryadjaya.

After five years of legal challenges by one of Indonesia’s richest citizens, Sukanto Tanoto, questioning whether he’d conspired with Deutsche Bank AG to buy the coal interest at an unfairly cheap price, Soeryadjaya’s name was cleared. He and the investors who put up money along with him would get to keep their shares, worth perhaps ten times the initial investment. Soeryadjaya’s own fortune of $250 million, of which Adaro represents more than two-thirds, would remain intact, thus securing him the 29th rank of Indonesia’s 40 Richest.

The legal victory also helped restore some glory and respect to his family. Once one of the country’s richest families, worth $2 billion in 1991, its fortune had been wiped out by debts incurred by his older brother Edward. “Adaro has been very important to us, and we’re happy with the outcome,” says Soeryadjaya.

At times it seemed an improbable outcome. “He [Tanoto] is a multibillionaire,” says Soeryadjaya, 58, who is worth one-twentieth as much as Tanoto, Indonesia’s second-richest person. “I’m the son of a former billionaire, but I’m just a working man.” The purchase of the coal mine was contested from the start. Tanoto and others, through a Singapore investment firm called Beckkett Pte, had pledged the 40% stake in Adaro to Deutsche Bank as collateral for a loan that had been in default since 1998, at the peak of the Asian crisis. Back then coal prices were depressed and Adaro was losing money. Negotiations had broken down and Beckkett’s representatives had allegedly told Deutsche it wouldn’t get its money back. So the bank began looking for an Indonesian buyer (as required by regulations) willing to take on Tanoto. With little to lose, Soeryadjaya, who by then was an active, albeit small-time, investor, led a group who paid $46 million, through holding company PT Dianlia Setyamukti, for 40%. Deutsche Bank got the deal approved by an Indonesian court. Dianlia later upped its stake to gain a majority interest; Soeryadjaya became Adaro’s president commissioner and a board member.

Tanoto’s firm didn’t get wind of all this until the sale was complete, something Deutsche stated in court documents was necessary to make sure the firm wouldn’t intervene. Beckkett got the court to overturn its approval. It also sued Deutsche and Dianlia, in Singapore (as the original loan agreement was governed by the laws of the city-state), alleging that the two parties had secretly conspired together to sell the assets at well below market value.

At one face-to-face meeting during the trial, Tanoto personally demanded the shares back. When asked about the incident, Soeryadjaya laughs, “You’ll have to ask Tanoto about that part. I have no hard feelings.” The same can’t be said of Tanoto, who has lost a valuable asset. Since the transaction coal prices have doubled. Indeed, Adaro is now probably worth $1.2 billion, up tenfold since 2002. “Of course I met with him as we all know the truth as to who owns the shares,” says Tanoto. “I believe and continue to believe that this will eventually come to light.” But the court awarded Beckkett only a token $665 from Deutsche, for not undertaking the sale of shares in a proper manner. And it ordered Beckkett to pay Soeryadjaya’s legal fees for the conspiracy claim. Beckkett is appealing.

The irony of the case is just how much Soeryadjaya could relate to Tanoto’s predicament. After all, Soeryadjaya would probably never have invested in Adaro had his family not lost its company to lenders. His father founded Astra in 1957 and built the automotive group into Indonesia’s second-biggest company. When Soeryadjaya’s older brother Edward decided to venture into banking, starting Bank Summa, William backed the loans with Astra shares. The father continued to support his son’s bank even as it spiraled deeper into debt. Indonesian regulators closed down the bank’s operations in 1992. After scrambling to find a way to keep control of Astra, William liquidated the family’s entire 76% stake to make good on Summa’s debts. The buyer was a consortium including fellow Indonesian rich lister, the Liem family, whose fortune is now listed under the name of son Anthoni Salim.

Soeryadjaya hints the family probably could have avoided paying Summa’s debts had they chosen to aggressively challenge the creditors, the route that many of Indonesia’s wealthiest families would pick a few years later during the 1997 Asian economic crisis. The Nursalim, Salim and Widjaja families all apparently cut favorable deals with banks to greatly reduce their debt. Eka Tjipta Widjaja and his family, for instance, managed to hold on to most of their fortune and are now worth $2.8 billion, despite the fact that their Asia Pulp & Paper infamously defaulted on more than $10 billion in debt in 2001. “In Indonesia, people get away with that sort of thing. No one pays a price for it; it’s just business as usual,” Soeryadjaya says.

But Soeryadjaya’s father, who had a strong distaste for cronyism, owned up to Bank Summa’s debts, publicly announcing that the family would not shy away from its obligations, even if it meant the end of the Soeryadjaya empire. “We would be billionaires, but we took responsibility for Summa’s failure,” says Soeryadjaya.

After the debacle Soeryadjaya went to work, in part to reestablish the family’s credentials. (“It wasn’t really about the money,” he says, insisting his lifestyle hadn’t changed.) Although the U.S.-educated son had been a vice president and board member of Astra, he jokes that he never had to work a day in his life before the family lost Astra. “I went to board meetings and nodded my head yes or no, but it didn’t really matter what I did,” he explains.

He got his start pooling money from high-net-worth friends and investing it into Indonesian infrastructure and natural resources companies. His first deal was a $650 million buyout of phone company Aria West, which he eventually sold to Telekomunikasi Indonesia. Soeryadjaya lost money on the investment, though all his investors who bought the debt got paid.

In 1998 he founded an investment firm, Saratoga Investama Sedaya, with Sandiaga Uno, 38, who had worked with his brother Edward. Soeryadjaya is chairman and owns 68% of the firm; Uno is chief executive and holds the rest. Saratoga’s first investment–with Newbridge Capital, the Asian arm of private equity firm Texas Pacific–was in a former Astra subsidiary, microchip company Microtronics. One of Saratoga’s biggest deals so far has been a $215 million leveraged buyout of PT Mitra Global Telekomunikasi Indonesia (MGTI), the largest landline phone provider in Java, in 2004.

Although he won’t disclose precise figures, Soeryadjaya says his firm’s returns on investment are between 30% and 40%. Only one of 15 companies in which it has invested has lost money: chipmaker Advanced Interconnect Technologies. Soeryadjaya says it was the firm’s only moneyloser–and the only deal he didn’t work on. Another deal he could never close: Saratoga tried twice to buy back Astra, with no luck.

Much of his firm’s success is tied to Adaro and the broader recovery of the Indonesian market in the decade since the start of the Asian crisis. Since buying the stake, Saratoga has helped boost its production from 18 million to 34 million tons of coal annually. It also restructured its debt in a 2005 leveraged buyout that brought in new investors such as the Government of Singapore Investment Corp. and reduced its share to 22%. Soaring coal prices helped lift Soeryadjaya’s fortunes along with those of other Indonesia rich listers, including Sjamsul Nursalim, ranked 17, and Aburizal Bakrie, who jumped to No. 1 thanks to a 600% rise during the past year in the stock of its coal company Bumi Resources.

There may still be more upside: China Shenhua Energy, China’s largest coal producer, is reportedly considering bidding for a controlling stake in Adaro in a deal that could value the company at $4 billion. Saratoga is also in talks with investment bankers to take Adaro public in the middle of 2008. As for the risk of Beckkett’s legal appeal, Soeryadjaya is unfazed: “Why would we cheat for $46 million when we didn’t cheat for $2 billion with Astra?”

Soeryadjaya is hoping to put Astra and the controversy of the Adaro purchase behind him. His firm is raising its first formal private equity fund of $300 million, set to close next year. International Finance Corp. has committed up to $25 million. Saratoga says it has raised another $65 million from investors, including CDC, formerly known as Commonwealth Development Corp. It will be a regional fund investing in Indonesia and possibly also Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam, places where his family saga is unknown. For now Soeryadjaya chalks up the demise of his father’s Astra and his own later success to fate. “My life is in God’s hands,” says the devout Christian. “There must be a reason for all of this.”

Sukanto Tanoto’s Corporate Sins

This is taken from Chris Wright’s article:

Lots of people know Sukanto well. 

Bank Mandiri, which published a list of its top bad debtors in 2006, with Sukanto’s Raja Garuda Mas pulp and paper company at the top by an absolute mile, owing Rp5.35 trillion in principal and interest at that time.

Sukanto’s conglomerate of interests – which also includes the pulp, paper and fibre group April, the palm oil group Asian Agri and the resources group Pacific Oil and Gas – was badly hit in the Asian financial crisis, which came just as April was in the middle of a US$2 billion fundraising exercise for expansion. For years subsequently, Sukanto companies struggled to repay their debts, a position that observers have struggled to square with his great personal wealth. In particular, the member companies of the April Group – Riau Andalan Pulp & Paper (RAPP), Riau Prima Energy and Riau Andalan Kertas – wrestled with the almost US$1.5 billion they owed in 1999, with many creditors claiming attempts at commercially workable restructurings had been blocked or delayed. Foreign banks thought to have had to sell out of their claims at steep losses include Citi, ING and Standard Chartered.

Sukanto Tanoto donation to Singapore

Dr. Karl Tryggvason, MD. is the Tanoto Professor of Diabetes Research at Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School in Singapore.
Dr. Karl Tryggvason was previously involved in a scandal in his previous position as the dean in Sweden’s prestigious Karolinska Institute. See http://www.nature.com/news/2010/100325/full/news.2010.144.html
As a diabetic patient, he also donated to the Tanoto Initiative for Diabetes Research (TIDR). He has donated over 1 million per year to Duke_NUS.

Sukanto Tanoto also donated to the Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts (NAFA) Library, established the Tanoto Foundation Centre for Southeast Asian Arts in April 2007, “with the vision to become a regional resource centre for the study and research of Southeast Asian arts”

Tanoto also donated to the  the NUS Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, by Establishment of The Tanoto Scholarship Fund .

Tanoto’s kind donation came from selling paper that came from old natural rainforests. Every year Singapore complains about receiving smoke from burning forests in Indonesia. Part of this smoke came from Tanoto’s plantation and forest clearing.

As you all know Sukanto Tanoto is the founder and chairman of APRIL, the largest paper mill compant in Indonesia that is responsible for clearing a large area of rain forests to produce paper. There is already a campaign by Rainforest Rescue to boycott paper produced by APRIL.

Now, we should have a campaign to make the Professors aware of the greenwashing done by Sukanto Tanoto via kind donation to universities. Taking from the Rainforest Rescue campaign, send the send the following email to:

To:

Dr. Karl Tryggvason, The Tanoto Professor of Diabetes Research, karl@tryggvason.com

Casey, Patrick J, Senior Vice Dean, patrick.casey@duke-nus.edu.sg

Krishnan, Ranga R, Dean ranga.krishnan@duke-nus.edu.sg

Dear Sirs,

I have noted with concern that you are accepting donation from Sukanto Tanoto with the Tanoto Professor of Diabetes Research at Duke-NUS.

As you know, Sukanto Tanoto is the chairman of APRIL (Asia Pacific Resources International Limited). APRIL is a compnay which is known to be responsible for clearing massive areas of rainforest in the Indonesian province of Riau to create acacia plantations.APRIL is also draining large areas of peat bog. APRIL’s production methods are an ecological, social, and climatic catastrophe.

Every year Singapore received smoke from forest fires in Indonesia with  the worst level of air pollution and triggering a health warning. These fires came from the clearing and destruction of rain forests in Sumatra and Kalimantan. Part of these are caused by the plantation operations by Sukanto Tanoto’s companies.

The rainforest on Sumatra is a highly diverse ecosystem – if the forest dies, the native animals and plants will have no chance to survive. This development especially threatens the critically endangered Sumatran Tiger – the greatest threat to this animal is listed as “the loss of habitat through palm oil and acacia plantations.” In 2010, APRIL was banned from the FSC certification system as a consequence of its production methods.

Furthermore, the rainforest is home to agricultural communities that process products traditionally and sustainably. The plantations are threatening to drive these farmers from their land and destroy their livelihoods.

The peat bogs in particular are important natural carbon sinks. In destroying the bogs, massive quantities of stored greenhouse gases are released into the atmosphere. Due to the destruction of its rainforests, Indonesia is the third-largest CO2 emitter in the world. The acacia plantations created to manufacture PaperOne paper exacerbate the negative impact on our climate.

As a respected university, you should share responsibility for ensuring that the donation you accept does not come from operation that destroy the environment, causing global warming, and destruct the habitat of human and animals.

I emphatically request that you consider the donation, consequently setting a positive example of how universities can embody corporate responsibility, respect for human rights, and environmental protection.

Respectfully,

Tanoto Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Dr. Larry Pileggi is proud to be the Tanoto Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Carnegie Mellon.
He even has a full biography of Sukanto Tanoto on his webpage.
CMU also gave him a full reception to congratulate him for clearing more forests and embezzled 250 millions of taxes from Indonesia.

Larry should know that Tanoto’s kind donation came from making papers out of trees from old natural rainforests. Sukanto Tanoto is the founder and chairman of APRIL, the largest paper mill company in Indonesia that is responsible for clearing a large area of rain forests to produce paper. There is already a campaign by Rainforest Rescue to boycott paper produced by APRIL.

Now, we should have a campaign to make the Professors aware of the greenwashing done by Sukanto Tanoto via kind donation to universities.

Join this petition against Carnegie Mellon to stop accepting money from rainforest destruction :
http://www.change.org/en-AU/petitions/carnegie-mellon-university-carnegie-mellon-university-stop-receiving-donation-from-sukanto-tanoto

Dean’s medal to Sukanto Tanoto

In October 2012, The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania awarded the Dean’s Medal, the School’s highest honor, to Sukanto Tanoto.

The news release from Wharton said:

Sukanto Tanoto is the Founder and Chairman of RGE, a global resources-based group of companies with corporate offices in Singapore, Hong Kong, China and Indonesia. At the University of Pennsylvania, Mr. Tanoto has supported the Wharton School through his contributions to the Chinese language edition of Knowledge@Wharton, the Global Alumni Forums, the Wharton Fund and the Wharton West Program Seed Fund. He is a member of the Wharton Board of Overseers, the Wharton Executive Board for Asia and the INSEAD International Council.

A self-made entrepreneur, Mr. Tanoto pioneered the plywood business in Indonesia in 1973. His company, RGE, has manufacturing operations in China, Indonesia and Brazil, as well as sales offices in four continents. He advocates the importance of social corporate responsibility in all of his endeavors, citing that operations must be “good for the community, good for the country and good for the company.” Mr. Tanoto is also passionate about using his success to help people in his native Indonesia and across the globe. In 2001, he and his family formed the Tanoto Foundation to help reduce poverty and advance human achievement; its primary focus is on education, empowerment and enhancement. The Foundation makes available scholarships to students, helps train teachers, builds schools and distributes equipment and books, in addition to providing health care in remote areas and rapid-response assistance in earthquakes and other natural calamities.

Mr. Tanoto is a Wharton Graduate Fellow, having completed an Executive Education program at the School in 2001. He and his wife Tinah have four children, three of whom are active alumni at Wharton.

Wharton School Dean’s Medal recognizes outstanding leaders of private enterprise, public service and academia.

Which means that of you donate enough money, they recognize you for the medal, even the money came from destroying the last rain forest in the world.

Join this petitioning against Wharton to stop accepting money from rainforest destruction and stop awarding Sukanto Tanoto with a medal:

http://www.change.org/en-AU/petitions/wharton-school-university-of-pennsylvania-stop-awarding-medal-to-and-receiving-donation-from-sukanto-tanoto-2

Sukanto Tanoto

Sukanto Tanoto is an Indonesian billionaire. He was named as Indonesian #6 richest by Forbes in 2011. Estimates worth  $2,800 M.

Many people know Sukanto Tanoto as the mysterious figure, cunning, and full of controversy. Born in Belawan, North Sumatra on December 25 1949, Sukanto known as the Timber Baron because of its ability to integrate forestry business under the flag Raja Garuda Mas (RGM). He is also known as the Limping Strong Man or Mr. Power of Medan, with plenty of clout. Mr. Sukanto acquired a reputation as a street-smart, tough tycoon. People tin Medan joked that only two Raja (Kings) in North Sumatra. First, Raja Inal Siregar (former governor of North Sumatra) and Raja Garuda Mas.

Sukanto Tanoto’s wife Tinah Bingei came from the Bingei Family in Binjai, North Sumatra which owns a cigarette company STTC (Sumatra Tobacco Trading Company) and Indo Cafe.

His business is mainly oil palm plantation, plywood, and pulp business.
He painted himself as a entrepreneur, visionary and pioneer of a number of industries in Indonesia. Also calling himself a philantropist building the Tanoto Foundation, with the “aim of educating and empowering marginalized members of the community so that they can improve their lives”

Sukanto Tanoto donated a chair position at Carnegie Mellon, the Tanoto Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering (Larry Pileggi) in 2011.
He also funded the Tanoto Professor of Diabetes Research at Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School (Singapore) given to Dr. Karl Tryggvason, MD. Tanoto foundation also is known to give research money for diabetic researchat Duke-NUS. Even the PM of Singapore thanked him.
In 2005, He donated to the INSEAD library in Singapore, called Tanoto Library.

Well, is Sukanto Tanoto really that generous.

Don’t know about Professors  Larry Pileggi and Karl Tryggvason, they are associated with the guy who is responsible for destroying millions of hectares of Indonesian natural forests for oil palm and paper. These professors were funded by money gained from clearing the rain forests and processed into papers.

If you have seen Avatar, Tanoto is the destroyer of Pandora.

Businessmen in Indonesia know Sukanto as a tricky businessman. He made his wealth out of nothing, all thanks to his connection with former president Soeharto.

His plywood company started from taking down rain forests. Asia Pacific Resources International Holdings Limited (or APRIL) is well known for illegal logging from peatlands in Pekan Baru.
PT Inti Indorayon Utama, his pulp and mill company was built in Porsea nearby Lake Toba of North Sumatra famous for Illegal logging, and land grabbing, water pollution in Asahan River and released toxic chlorine gas during the 1993 boiler explosion.

While now APRIL set up an image as an environmental friendly paper, it is well known that in Indonesia that its paper all came from illegal logging of the natural forests. Although now it claimed all to be from sustainable plantation, the plantation is still being grown and does not have enough capacity to fill the paper’s quota. Also, claiming to used degraded land, all the plantation came from conversion of natural forests thanks to the connection with the Ministry of Forestry.
Subsidized land, virtually free wood, and low wages make it all too easy for Tanoto to be the king of pulp. See more in this book, a chapter by Larry Lohmann ‘Freedom to Plant’. Although the information is mostly correct, Larry made several mistakes in the name: calling it Riau Andalan, while it should be Riau Andalas. Larry also called Sukanto Tanoto as Harvard educated, but clearly not. APRIL is famous for producing Paper One, supplying to different countries.

It is recently analyzed that APRIL’s product is made up of 84 per cent tropical rainforest fibre, while it is labeled LEI (Indonesia Ecolabel Institute) accreditation scheme which ”ensures the paper meets the particular qualifications of a fair and sustainable forest management standard”Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/environment/conservation/rainforest-fibres-found-in-chains-office-paper-20110819-1j2bz.html#ixzz2HquOfRqh

APRIL advertised itself as “the first forestry firm in Indonesia to meet the high standards set by the Indonesian Ecolabeling Institute Criteria & Indicators for Sustainable Forest Plantation Management (PHTL). It continues to set environmental and sustainability benchmarks, and all of its plantations are certified ISO 9001, ISO 14001 and OHSAS 18001. APRIL is a signatory to the UN Global Compact and is one of only two Asian members of the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD). APRIL has also been a member of the Fire Management Actions Alliance coordinated by the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) of United Nations.”

Clearly this is not happening, a 2011 Australia’s ABC program has showed how APRIL is paying a local official so they can illegally log peat forests in the Kampar
http://www.abc.net.au/foreign/content/2011/s3283804.htm


In an Interview with a Singaporean newspaper The Business Time, he said: “Trees take about 60 years to mature in the cold European climate, about 25 to 30 years on American soil, and only six to seven years in Indonesia.”

‘I always say that the Scandinavians grow trees for their grandchildren, Americans grow them for their children. Here in Indonesia, you grow trees for yourself,’ he says with a chuckle.

Don’t know where he get this logic from, in Indonesia it takes the same amount of time to grow tree as elsewhere. The Scandinavian make sure their grandchildren will still have tree, Americans make sure their children have tree, and in Indonesia bastard like Sukanto Tanoto make sure he got all the tree for himself and none left for his children and grandchildren.

Having said that, Tanoto is one of the few Indonesian that actually set up a philanthropy foundation. Compare this to Eka Tjipta Widjaja, another beast (Indonesian #3 wealthiest) who take all for himself. Beside a chair in Carnegie Mellon only costs Tanoto less than 0.01 percent of his wealth. A scholarship in Indonesia only costs him less than 0.0001 percent of his wealth. And he can claim tax break from Singaporean government as well.
Well, the latest news is the Supreme Court of Indonesia has ordered plantation conglomerate Asian Agri Group, part of billionaire Sukanto Tanoto’s Raja Garuda Mas International group, to pay Rp 2.52 trillion ($260 million) in back taxes and fines for tax embezzlement.