Tanoto Planetarium

Sukanto Tanoto also likes studying planet. After destroying the earth, burning and cutting down all the trees Sukanto needs to find another planet to exploit. That’s why Sukanto Tanoto through his Tanoto Foundation (established in Samoa) donated a huge amount of money to build a planetarium that is is named after him: Tanoto Planetarium and Digital Theater.
Sukanto can find the next planet he can destroy and reap.
Sukanto also regularly donated to the DEERFIELD ACADEMY in Massachusetts.

http://www.aplf-planetariums.info/en/index.php?onglet=planetariums&menu=sheet_planetarium&filtre=252

tan2

DEERFIELD ACADEMY, founded in 1797, is an independent, co-educational boarding school located in Western Massachusetts. It is an executive boarding school for the billionaire. This is where Sukanto sent his sons and daughters.

Imelda Tanoto is a graduate in 2001
Belinda tanoto is a graduate in 2003
Anderson Tanoto is a graduate in 2007

How about Andre, his eldest son. poor Andre didn’t get the chance to study there.

The fee is around $50,000 per year. That’s just a small amount for Sukanto.

Deerfield_Seal

Advertisements

SINGAPORE – A SAFE HAVEN for Sukanto

Singapore has been helping many Indonesian millionaires to dodge tax and keep their money from plantations and forests. This is not new. With the haze and smog, Singapre should be taking the consequence of harboring billions of dollars extracted from the Indonesian environment

This is a report from THE THOUSAND-HEADED SNAKE: FOREST CRIMES, CORRUPTION AND INJUSTICE IN INDONESIA published by the Environmental Investigation Agency in 2007. http://www.eia-international.org.php5-20.dfw1-1.websitetestlink.com/wp-content/uploads/reports135-1.pdf Nothing changes, Sukanto Tanoto is still iving in Singapore, his compant Royal Golden Eagle is based in Singapore .

 

The small island-state of Singapore is a key accomplice in the forest crimes carried out in Indonesia. Money derived from illegal logging is laundered through its secretive banks, its shipping companies carry the timber overseas, and its wood traders sell the stolen goods onto the international market. Indonesian government officials have been critical of the lack of cooperation from their Singaporean counterparts when it comes to anti-money laundering and extradition of fugitives.

A recent study of the Asia Pacific region’s dollar millionaires found that of the 55 000 resident “High Net Worth Individuals” in Singapore, 18 000 are from Indonesia. The whole of Indonesia has only 17 000 millionaires. More rich Indonesians choose to live in Singapore than in their own country for a number of reasons, but an important one is the secrecy of the banking system. The study quotes a banker as saying: “In following Switzerland’s model for banking secrecy, only Luxembourg even begins to come close to Singapore,” adding that the Singaporean government assures client confidentiality for those choosing to bank there.(51)

Assets held by wealthy Indonesians living in Singapore total a staggering US$87 billion, more than Indonesia’s annual state budget for 2006.

While much of this wealth has been derived by legitimate means, a substantial portion comes from crimes carried out in Indonesia. Indonesian officials have recorded cases of at least 200 individuals who owe the state money sheltering in Singapore over the last seven years.(52)

Conscientious banker Andy Xie revealed his personal opinion of Singapore’s financial success in a leaked email sent to colleagues. Wie, former Chief Economist in Asia for Morgan Stanley, wrote: “Actually, Singapore’s success came mostly from being the money laundering centre for corrupt Indonesian businessmen and government officials.”(53)

Predictably efforts to retrieve some of the illicit money stashed away in Singapore often fail. Yunus Husein, chairman of Indonesia’s PPATK, said: “It’s very hard to get information from Singapore. When we asked them to help us (track down) the money, they always say that… it’s not their problem.”(54)

Singapore has robust internal rules under the Prevention of Money Laundering Act of 2002. A central element of the act is the “Know Your Customer” initiative, a legal requirement under which financial institutions are legally required to report suspicious transactions to the authorities. Yet the scheme only applies to transactions linked to serious crime or terrorism, and revenues derived from illegal logging appear to fall outside its scope.

Recently the Indonesian government used the UN Convention Against Corruption to secure the assistance of the United Kingdom in freezing a bank account linked to Tommy Suharto, son of the former Indonesian president. This form of cooperation is not an option when it comes to Singapore, as the country has yet to ratify the convention.

Investigations undertaken by EIA/Telapak reveal that Singaporean banks are preferred for opening letters of credit for numerous deals involving Indonesian logs. In 2004 Hong Kong timber trader Shelman Siu told investigators that most of the payments by Chinese buyers for illegal merbau logs from Papua were made through Singaporean banks.

Analysis of the activities of timber tycoon Abdul Rasyid show that a series of payments for illegal logs flowed into his personal account in Singapore, and the business account of one of his partners. Although Rasyid bought property in Singapore, he did not opt to take out Singaporean Permanent Resident Status, a course of action followed by Ali Jambi. Such a status can be obtained for an investment of around half-a-million US dollars, and proof of an “entrepreneurial background”.

The lack of an extradition treaty between the two neighbours adds to the attractiveness of the island-state for Indonesians fleeing justice. Requests for such a treaty from the Indonesian government date back to the 1970s, with formal negotiations not starting until early 2005. Talks between the two sides have been through nine rounds – usually two or three rounds are sufficient – and still the treaty has not been signed. Singapore’s latest delaying tactic is to insist that the extradition treaty must be signed at the same time as a defence treaty.(55)

Many of the perpetrators of one of the worse financial crimes ever committed found their way to Singapore. The Bank Indonesia Liquidity Assistance scandal took place in the later 1990s, at the height of the regional economic crisis. The central bank gave out US$13.5 billion to 48 of the country’s banks to avoid their collapse. Of these funds 99 per cent were misused by the bank owners, money which was effectively stolen from the state at a time of crisis and hardship for most of the population.(56) Agus Anwar, head of Bank Pelita, was charged with stealing Rp 1.89 trillion (US$210 million) and promptly moved to Singapore, where he obtained citizenship. While Indonesia bears the bulk of the responsibility for failing to arrest suspects before they flee, an extradition between the two neighbours would support the efforts of those trying to reform the justice system in Indonesia.

Another powerful Indonesian tycoon who found refuge in Singapore is Sukanto Tanoto, recently named as Indonesian wealthiest person with family assets of US$2.8 billion.(57) Sukanto was wanted by the police in connection with the failure of Unibank in 2001, a bank he owned which collapsed with Rp 3.9 trillion (US$429 million) in debt. Despite an instruction being issued by the Indonesian government banning him from leaving the country, Sukanto managed to abscond to Singapore.

Sukanto is also owner of the Raja Garuda Mas Group, which includes the Singapore-based pulp and paper company Asia Pacific Resources International Holding Ltd. (APRIL). The company has cleared vast tracts of land in Sumatra to feed its pulp mills, and has been accused on a number of occasions of receiving timber from forests with a high conservation value and from illegal sources inside national parks.(58, 59)

tan

tan4

Sukanto Tanoto’s palace in Margoliouth, Bukit Timah, Singapore.

烟霾中的大亨

Sukanto Tanoto

大家是否想不通,为什么东南亚三国政府无法或不愿处理多年的烟霾困扰?或许我们尝试往现实的一面看,找出政商的利害关係,才能破解这个比烟霾迷濛的迷思。
首先,印尼总统的高层幕僚Kuntoro Mangkusubroto多次表示,大部分热点都位于Asia Pulp and Paper(APP)及Asia Pacific Resources International Limited(APRIL)的营业范围內。
但是,印尼环境部长对新加坡环境部长表示,没有任何新加坡公司涉及印尼非法烧芭活动。
对于印尼总统苏西洛的道歉,新加坡总理李显龙表示「全心全意」接受。新加坡外交部同时也表示,若有证据证明新加坡公司涉及这类活动,政府將会採取进一步行动对付这些公司。
上联不对下联,这葫芦里究竟卖的是什么膏药?APRIL是伐木业大龙头陈江和(Sukanto Tanoto)旗下的公司。陈江和在2006年受《富比士》杂誌奉为印尼首富,同年也被印尼国营的Mandini银行列为六大不良债务人之一。他曾经涉及自己的银行Unibank的诈欺案被调查。陈江和家財万贯,拥有5.4兆印尼卢比的资產。
APRIL公司运作基地在哪里?新加坡。
1997年亚洲金融危机,百富勤投资(Peregrine)將公司三分二资金借给了印尼两家经营不善的公司,其中一家是Asia Pulp & Paper(APP)。APP是黄奕聪(Eka Tjipta Widjaya)的旗下公司。黄奕聪就是金光集团的创办人,外號「东南亚区最大的不良负债人教父」(见周博的《亚洲教父》)。
后来百富勤借出的钱都没收回,百富勤宣告倒闭。1997年的亚洲金融危机,APP负债140亿美元。APP公司运作基地在哪里?新加坡。
印尼政府、新加坡政府和巨亨的微妙关係,如果推索回当年的金融风暴,一种歷史上建立已久的密切关係就逐渐浮出檯面了。据《亚洲教父》,当年印尼政府不与巨亨作对的主要原因,是相信他们会把撤资慢慢地移回国內。杰出企业经理人钱伯斯当时推论,单是新加坡就拥有高达2千亿美元的印尼资金。
《亚洲教父》作者周博说过,东南亚经济是政治和经济力量交互作用下的结果。看懂了政商勾结纠缠不清的关係,就看懂了各单位所扮演的角色:正派或反派其实都是一派。在这样的氛围之下,烟霾问题只好搁置一旁了。

 

http://www.orientaldaily.com.my/index.php?option=com_k2&view=item&id=62490:&Itemid=202

Sukanto Tantoto and Smoke: Old Story

Those who still remember the 2006 smog in Singapore should revisit the news and see that nothing change.

 

The war of fog: industry insists it’s fighting Asian haze

Source: Copyright 2006, Agence France-Presse
Date: October 6, 2006
Byline: Sebastien Blanc
Original URL: Status DEAD

As thick haze chokes Southeast Asia and drifts across the Pacific, the pulp and paper industry, blamed for failing to prevent the burning of vast swathes of Indonesian forest, says it’s doing its best to fight the scourge.

According to Greenpeace, forest clearing for acacia pulpwood and oil palm plantations is the leading cause of illegal fires and suffocating haze which has closed schools, disrupted air traffic and caused widespread breathing problems.

The annual illegal burn-off in Indonesia, which officials have been accused of doing little to stop, sees acrid smoke billow across the region, with Malaysia, Singapore and southern Thailand usually worst affected.

This week, the haze had also spread 3,600 kilometres (2,250 miles) to smother islands in the western Pacific.

But giant companies like Asia Pacific Resources International Holdings Ltd. (APRIL) and Asia Pulp and Paper (APP), among the world’s biggest pulp and paper producers, say they are committed to fighting the fires — even though their plantations keep expanding.

“We use only mechanical methods to clear the land,” said Brad Senders, APRIL fire, safety and aviation manager. “We don’t want to contribute to the smoke and haze.”

Both companies have their headquarters in Singapore and are part of powerful conglomerates — Sinar Mas for APP, Raja Garuda Mas for APRIL — controlled by tycoons.

Sukanto Tanoto, boss of Raja Garuda Mas, which has interests in palm oil, construction and energy, was named as the richest man in Indonesia by Forbes Asia magazine last month.

Net plantable areas under APRIL management cover more than 400,000 hectares (nearly a million acres) and the company’s mill near this city of Pangkalan Kerinci is the second biggest in the world in terms of designed production capacity.

APRIL uses around 9 million cubic meters (nearly 12 million cubic yards) of wood annually for its yearly production capacity of 2 million tons of pulp. APP capacities are similar.

As of the end of June 2006, APRIL says it has planted about 300,000 hectares of acacia, but still acknowledges that 55 percent of the wood it uses comes from natural forests.

This angers conservationists, who are concerned that rare wildlife, such as Sumatran tigers, Sumatran elephants and birds, face extinction.

“We need the wood as raw material for pulp and paper. Why would we burn it? We do not want charcoal mixed in chips,” APRIL’s Senders, presenting his team of firefighters which is equipped with a water-dropping helicopter.

Dressed in red overalls and equipped with radio transmitters, their goal is to get to fires within two hours of receiving a report, flying by helicopter equipped with portable water pumps, hoses and axes.

“Since 1996, APP has insisted that its fiber suppliers implement a strict no-burn policy,” said company spokeswoman Aida Greenbury.

The company claims to have more than 600 trained fire officers and three full-time fire-suppression helicopters to patrol the forests and control fires.

But environmental groups insist burning is continuing in APRIL and APP concessions.

“We found some evidence that there are hotspots in their concessions and the concessions of their sub-contractors,” Rully Syumanda from Walhi, the Indonesian branch of Friends of the Earth, told AFP.

A coalition of three non-government organisations in Sumatra’s Riau province asserted that from January to August this year, 8,876 hotspots were detected there.

By associated pulp mill, APP contributed to 745 hotspots and APRIL 523, with the remainder unknown or unidentified groups, the coalition said in September.

“Unfortunately, fires still do occur in APP operating areas,” Greenbury concedes.

“These are frequently started illegally by villagers seeking to clear land so that they can plant oil palms, rubber or other crops.”

WWF’s Indonesian species conservation director Nazir Foead agrees that small companies are enticed to burn.

“For small companies doing palm oil, the best and cheapest way is to set fire. You don’t need bulldozers,” he said.

Shanmugam was a director of Golden Agri-Resources

Many of the  plantations involved in burning are owned by people with intimate connections to that same power court in Singapore, who helpfully provide them all manner of metropolitan usefulness, banking their billions and domiciling their empires while discreetly looking past, er, indiscretions that may have been perpetrated elsewhere.

Many of these plantations are owned by people with intimate connections to that same power court in Singapore, who helpfully provide them all manner of metropolitan usefulness, banking their billions and domiciling their empires.

Namely: Sukanto Tanoto, Martua Stitorus

Singapore has 101,000 millionaires officially resident on the island, their assets tucked safely away in the nation’s banks, property and share markets. Plenty of these plutocrats are normal Singaporeans who’ve done well in business. But many are not, like corrupt Indonesians on the run, or Burmese generals seeking safe haven. Singapore’s plutocratic ranks have been swelled in recent years by Europeans and Russians seeking relief from tax and the prying regulators of home, these exiles spending just enough time and money in Singapore to qualify for residency.

Shanmugam’s was a former     stints as a director of Golden Agri-Resources and Asia Food and Property Ltd.

Both are Singaporean companies controlled by Indonesia’s controversial Widjaja family. In the early 2000s, while Shanmugam was on these boards, the Widjajas had the dubious honour of owning the notorious Asia Pulp and Paper, which would come to be responsible for the biggest    bond default in corporate Asian history.

http://www.theglobalmail.org/feature/out-of-the-haze-a-singapore-spring/646/

Singapore reaps what it sowed


An excavator creates a canal in Riau Province, Indonesia,  despite the heavy smoke caused by the forest fires. © Ulet Ifansasti /  Greenpeace

Read more at http://news.mongabay.com/2013/0624-haze-stocks.html#wA6LjJtdzk6vQ5VC.99

 

http://joestudwell.wordpress.com/2013/06/22/singapore-reaps-what-it-sowed/

The story identifies two firms as largely responsible for the fires:

1. APP (Asia Pulp & Paper). The tale is too long to tell in detail here. Look it up in Asian Godfathers. Controlled by the Widjaya family, who defaulted on US$14 billion of debt (no, that is not a typing error) during the Asian crisis and then set out to buy the debt back at cents on the dollar. They did this by the most extraordinary acts of financial subterfuge, many of which were run through Singapore-based and Singapore-’regulated’ institutions. A 2002 petition by creditors to the Singapore courts to have APP taken over and run by a local administrator was rejected. The Widjayas are serial law breakers. Where is their business run from? Singapore. Where did they hole up, and who protected them, after the Asian crisis? Singapore.

2. APRIL (Asia Pacific Resources International Holdings Ltd). Controlled by Sukanto Tanoto, who in the wake of the Asian crisis in 2006 was listed by Indonesian state bank Mandiri as one of its six biggest delinquent debtors. He owed Rupiah5.4 trillion. Tanoto was also under investigation for fraud at his own bank, Unibank, which after the Asian crisis was reported by regulators to have extended 51% of its loans to Tanoto firms; the maximum legal limit for loans to related parties was 20%. Tanoto is a serial law breaker. Where is his business run from? Singapore. Where did he hole up, and who protected him, after the Asian crisis? Singapore.

Finally, what is the east Asian market where it has been least possible to distribute Asian Godfathers since its publication in 2007 (way more difficult than in ‘authoritarian’ China). That’s right. Singapore!

 


A Greenpeace activist bears witness to forest destruction in  Riau Province, Indonesia. © Ulet Ifansasti / Greenpeace
Read more at http://news.mongabay.com/2013/0624-greenpeace-photos.html#XgTMeYCT2cvgH82M.99

Sukanto Tanoto is Richest Singaporean

According to http://sbr.com.sg/financial-services/exclusive/singapores-11-top-billionaires

Sukanto Tanoto is Singapore’s top billionaires

Sukanto Tanoto is Singapore’s favourite citizen..So is Martua Sitorus

Singapore shouldn’t complain to Indonesia about the haze

Both Sukanto Tanoto’s companies APRIL and Martua Sitorus Wilmar are responsible for the fire in Riau

http://everythingalsocomplain.com/2013/06/21/sinar-mas-and-april-blamed-for-haze/

http://joestudwell.wordpress.com/2013/06/22/singapore-reaps-what-it-sowed/

tan3

Sukanto Tanoto’s Palace in Bukit Timah, Singapore

A letter to NUS Medicine

http://medicine.nus.edu.sg/corporate/aboutus/contactus.aspx#deansoffice

Dear Madam & Sir,

I am sure that you suffered from the haze and smog that covered across Singapore last week.
As you know, the smoke comes from deliberate burning of forests and oil palm plantations in Sumatra.
One of the main company responsible for the fire is Royal Golden Eagle (RGE) and Asia Pacific Resources International Limited (APRIL)
You can read about the analysis from the World Research Institute website
http://insights.wri.org/news/2013/06/peering-through-haze-what-data-can-tell-us-about-fires-Indonesia
The chairman of both companies is Mr. Sukanto Tanoto, your main donator.

I have noted with concern that you are accepting donation from Sukanto Tanoto, establishing the Tanoto Scholarship Fund at NUS.
How would you feel about a Scholarship in NUS named after the person whose companies are responsible for the haze.

Sukanto Tanoto is the chairman of APRIL (Asia Pacific Resources International Limited). APRIL is also a company which is known to be responsible for clearing massive areas of rainforest in the Indonesian province of Riau to create acacia plantations.APRIL is also draining large areas of peat bog. APRIL’s production methods are an ecological, social, and climatic catastrophe.

Every year Singapore received smoke from forest fires in Indonesia with the worst level of air pollution and triggering a health warning. These fires came from the clearing and destruction of rain forests in Sumatra and Kalimantan. Part of these are caused by the plantation operations by Sukanto Tanoto’s companies.
The rainforest on Sumatra is a highly diverse ecosystem – if the forest dies, the native animals and plants will have no chance to survive. This development especially threatens the critically endangered Sumatran Tiger – the greatest threat to this animal is listed as “the loss of habitat through palm oil and acacia plantations.” In 2010, APRIL was banned from the FSC certification system as a consequence of its production methods.
Furthermore, the rainforest is home to agricultural communities that process products traditionally and sustainably. The plantations are threatening to drive these farmers from their land and destroy their livelihoods.
The peat bogs in particular are important natural carbon sinks. In destroying the bogs, massive quantities of stored greenhouse gases are released into the atmosphere. Due to the destruction of its rainforests, Indonesia is the third-largest CO2 emitter in the world. The acacia plantations created to manufacture PaperOne paper exacerbate the negative impact on our climate.
As a respected university, you should share responsibility for ensuring that the donation you accept does not come from operation that destroy the environment, causing global warming, and destruct the habitat of human and animals.
I emphatically request that you consider the donation, consequently setting a positive example of how universities can embody corporate responsibility, respect for human rights, and environmental protection.

Respectfully,

A Letter to the President of NAFA

 
Dear Madam & Sir,
 
I am sure you suffered from the haze and smog that covered across Singapore last week
As you know, the smoke comes from deliberate burning of forests and oil palm plantations in Sumatra.
One of the main company responsible for the fire is Royal Golden Eagle (RGE) and Asia Pacific Resources International Limited (APRIL)
You can read about the analysis from the World Research Institute website
The chairman of both companies is Mr. Sukanto Tanoto, your main donator.
 
I have noted with concern that you are accepting donation from Sukanto Tanoto, establishing the Tanoto Foundation Centre for Southeast Asian Arts at NAFA.
How would you feel about a Library named after the person whose companies are responsible for the haze.
 
Sukanto Tanoto is the chairman of APRIL (Asia Pacific Resources International Limited). APRIL is also a company which is known to be responsible for clearing massive areas of rainforest in the Indonesian province of Riau to create acacia plantations.APRIL is also draining large areas of peat bog. APRIL’s production methods are an ecological, social, and climatic catastrophe.
 
Every year Singapore received smoke from forest fires in Indonesia with  the worst level of air pollution and triggering a health warning. These fires came from the clearing and destruction of rain forests in Sumatra and Kalimantan. Part of these are caused by the plantation operations by Sukanto Tanoto’s companies.
The rainforest on Sumatra is a highly diverse ecosystem – if the forest dies, the native animals and plants will have no chance to survive. This development especially threatens the critically endangered Sumatran Tiger – the greatest threat to this animal is listed as “the loss of habitat through palm oil and acacia plantations.” In 2010, APRIL was banned from the FSC certification system as a consequence of its production methods.
Furthermore, the rainforest is home to agricultural communities that process products traditionally and sustainably. The plantations are threatening to drive these farmers from their land and destroy their livelihoods.
The peat bogs in particular are important natural carbon sinks. In destroying the bogs, massive quantities of stored greenhouse gases are released into the atmosphere. Due to the destruction of its rainforests, Indonesia is the third-largest CO2 emitter in the world. The acacia plantations created to manufacture PaperOne paper exacerbate the negative impact on our climate.
As a respected university, you should share responsibility for ensuring that the donation you accept does not come from operation that destroy the environment, causing global warming, and destruct the habitat of human and animals.
I emphatically request that you consider the donation, consequently setting a positive example of how universities can embody corporate responsibility, respect for human rights, and environmental protection.
 
Respectfully,

A Letter to The Tanoto Professor of Diabetes Research

Prof. Karl Tryggvason, The Tanoto Professor of Diabetes Research, 

Prof. Patrick Casey, Vice Dean

Prof. Ranga Krishnan, Dean

 

Dear Sirs,

My deep sympathy with the haze and smog that covered across Singapore last week

As you know, the smoke comes from deliberate burning of forests and oil palm plantations in Sumatra.

One of the main company responsible for the fire is Royal Golden Eagle (RGE) and Asia Pacific Resources International Limited (APRIL)

You can read about the analysis from the World Research Institute website

http://insights.wri.org/news/2013/06/peering-through-haze-what-data-can-tell-us-about-fires-Indonesia

The chairman of both companies is Mr. Sukanto Tanoto, your main donator.

 

I have noted with concern that you are accepting donation from Sukanto Tanoto with the Tanoto Professor of Diabetes Research at Duke-NUS.

As you know, Sukanto Tanoto is the chairman of APRIL (Asia Pacific Resources International Limited). APRIL is also a company which is known to be responsible for clearing massive areas of rainforest in the Indonesian province of Riau to create acacia plantations.APRIL is also draining large areas of peat bog. APRIL’s production methods are an ecological, social, and climatic catastrophe.

 

Every year Singapore received smoke from forest fires in Indonesia with  the worst level of air pollution and triggering a health warning. These fires came from the clearing and destruction of rain forests in Sumatra and Kalimantan. Part of these are caused by the plantation operations by Sukanto Tanoto’s companies.

The rainforest on Sumatra is a highly diverse ecosystem – if the forest dies, the native animals and plants will have no chance to survive. This development especially threatens the critically endangered Sumatran Tiger – the greatest threat to this animal is listed as “the loss of habitat through palm oil and acacia plantations.” In 2010, APRIL was banned from the FSC certification system as a consequence of its production methods.

Furthermore, the rainforest is home to agricultural communities that process products traditionally and sustainably. The plantations are threatening to drive these farmers from their land and destroy their livelihoods.

The peat bogs in particular are important natural carbon sinks. In destroying the bogs, massive quantities of stored greenhouse gases are released into the atmosphere. Due to the destruction of its rainforests, Indonesia is the third-largest CO2 emitter in the world. The acacia plantations created to manufacture PaperOne paper exacerbate the negative impact on our climate.

As a respected university, you should share responsibility for ensuring that the donation you accept does not come from operation that destroy the environment, causing global warming, and destruct the habitat of human and animals.

I emphatically request that you consider the donation, consequently setting a positive example of how universities can embody corporate responsibility, respect for human rights, and environmental protection.

 

Respectfully,